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20121202
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the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> the administration has presented a plan that calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues. $400 billion in cuts to medicare and other entitlements. $50 billion for a new stimulus and congress would have to give up control over raising the debt limit. republicans have indicated that they want to raise revenue by lowering tax deductions, haven't given any specifics yet. brings us right to white house correspondent brianna keilar. good morning, brianna. >> good morning to you, soledad. yes, things are at an impasse here. i will tell you the white house after not being very happy with the pace of negotiations the week before last sent treasury secretary tim geithner up to the hill to outline this proposal. there's a lot we already knew about that president obama had already taken a public position on. the white house is now saying to republicans as well, we want you to put
, the former companisy campaign manager of president obama's re-election campaign. howard kurtz the host of "cnn's reliable sources" lauren ashburn, republican from texas, congressman jeb hensarling with us, randy weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. all guests this morning. wednesday, december 5th, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> our "starting point" this morning, president obama putting his foot down. he says no tax hikes for the wealthy, no deal. america hits that fiscal cliff in 27 days and that means tax hikes and deep spending cuts if the democrats and the republicans can't come together in some kind of a deal and with just ten days remaining until congress is scheduled to go home for the holidays, the clock ticking. here's what he told bloomberg news. listen. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able it to get a deal without it. >> we start this morning with white house correspondent dan lothian, he's in washington, d.c. okay. so who's got the ball in their court at this point then, dan? >> well,
young people. we're really just focused on the elect officials who seem to be doing a lot of nothing. >> morale is so low for my generation. because they feel like no matter what, nothing is going to get done. and they speak in a language that they don't understand. i do it for a job, so i know about it, but my friends feel like they have no idea what's going on. >> and this cynicism is really strong. because i think they feel, you know, 27 days to go and they just assume nothing is going to happen for the next three weeks. and they look at the countdown clocks on television news networks like this one and say, oh, well, nothing's going to happen until we go over the cliff. i don't have tune in or worry about it. >> i wonder if that dancing 84-year-old senator is a way to break through. >> we're the ones who will be the most affected by it. we're getting the $16 trillion deficit passed down to us. >> do you think young people get that, though? do you think they understand the long-term consequences? >> not like they should. >>> still ahead this morning on "starting point," they're an
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)